music producer at work

Do I Need a Music Producer?

For an aspiring independent musician, music production can be a baffling process. You know the scene, you have just spent days, weeks and more preparing, writing and rehearsing your tracks. But what are your next steps when it comes to recording?

“do I need a music producer?”

“how much should I pay?”

“what do they even do?!”

These are all very important things to think about, but we’ve pulled together some great advice to help you get an understanding of what they do, and whether you need one.

(and loads of great music producers on Twine for you to choose from!)

  1. What is a music producer?

  2. What can a producer do?

  3. How much does a music producer cost?

  4. But really, do i need a producer?!

What is a music producer?

To put it simply, a music producer’s job is to make your tracks sound better and help you make decisions about your music. They’re less emotionally invested, so they can give you an objective opinion that you might struggle to come to on your own. In reality though, there’s lots involved in a producer’s job. They might start in the pre-production phase, helping you pick your best songs and fine-tuning them before you even get in the recording studio. They’ll help find you a studio to work in, book it and when recording starts they’ll oversee it. Some might even help with marketing your track when it’s finished.

What can producers do?

Over the years music producers have evolved to hold multiple quivers in their bows, mainly due to the advent of digital music wizardry & other technological advancements.

Whilst it is true that every music producer is different and brings their own skill sets & abilities, most producers are seen as an alchemist that brings all elements together.

In very pragmatic terms, the producer is a ‘project manager’ for the recording, mixing and mastering process.

How much does a music producer cost?

Production doesn’t come cheap though. It’s an extensive process (we’re talking many hours of labour), and for high end professional work in the UK you’re looking at between £2000-£10,000 per track (and way way above that for big releases!) Even on the low end, you could be spending £300-£1000 a song. This calculator is useful for giving you a clearer idea of exact figures. It’s worth bearing in mind that cost can vary by genre too – hip-hop producers tend to charge more as they’re often featured as a selling point for the track.

what a music producer actually does

If you’re a new artist or band, working on a small release, you can probably cut a few corners. For one, you might only need your music producer to supervise certain parts of the process. If money’s tight, independent artists frequently self-produce – bedroom studios are on the rise and it’s definitely possible to self-produce high calibre music. This is easier if you’re a band as well, as you’re likely to all have different skills and knowledge.

But really, why should I hire a producer?!

Ultimately, the value of a music producer can’t be overstated so if you can afford one it’s definitely worth investing. You might have to shell out some cash, but having a producer can seriously change the quality of an album, and they can give you valuable, experienced insight into the music industry as a whole. Basically, chances are they know more than you and your album will come out more polished.

If you’re in the market for a music producer, we’ve got loads of great freelance producers looking for work on Twine – simply get your brief up on the project board and wait for the pitches to come flooding in. We make finding a great producer effortless. You’ve got loads of choice from a whole community of talented creatives and with our shiny new ratings system you can see what other people think of their work. The icing on the cake? Our payments system is quick, easy and very secure. Find out more by clicking here.

In any case, a good music producer might just save you from a home invasion –

 

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Matt Nuttall

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Matt Nuttall