How to write the perfect brief

Why is it important?

Your project brief is there to attract the best creative talent to pitch on your project. It’s the very first contact your creative will have with you, so make a good first impression. Treat it like an advert and sell yourself and your project. Make sure they choose your project and not someone else’s.

project-briefs

What we do on Twine

On Twine we make writing a project brief quick and easy. All you have to do is fill in a few details about your project and you’re good to go. Your brief is posted up on our project briefs page and creatives can pitch to be involved. So how do you make sure it’s attractive to the right creatives?

Draw them in

Attract creatives to view your brief with an eye-catching title. This will be the first thing the creative sees so make sure it piques their interest:

Good-title-example

What to include?

Creatives will use the brief to check whether they’ve got the right skills for the job, so write a detailed project specification in the project description box. If they can’t work out what you need, they’ll pass you by. The more information your creative has, the better job they can do. Here are some things to consider:

  • Deadline
  • Budget
  • Software/hardware needed
  • Local/remote
  • What’s the purpose of the project? Who’s the intended audience?
  • Style/genre

Good-description-example

How to sell yourself

Give them reasons to believe in your project. Creatives are inundated with project requests so tell them why they should pick yours. What are they getting out of your project?

Mind your language

Creatives are only interested in serious briefs so make sure yours looks professional. Use professional language and show you’re legit:

“Need vocalz 4 my trak”

vs

“I’m looking for a female vocalist for my track. It’s a tropical house, summer vibe floorfiller. Lyrics are written, just need the right person to bring it to life. It’ll be premiered at the summer beach party so big opportunity for exposure here! Needs to be completed in 1 – 2 months”

It’s clear which one a serious professional would go for.

Money talks

It’s an obvious one, but professional creatives usually aren’t interested in free or poorly paid projects. If you want top quality work, you must be prepared to pay for it. You’ve got the option to set a fixed price budget. These articles will give you an idea of what you can expect to pay:

Setting budgets for graphic design

Logo budgets

Animation budgets

Video budgets 

If you’re still unsure, you have the option to receive offers.

You also have the option to ‘receive offers’, if you’re unsure what your budget should be. Creatives will pitch in with different budgets. You can then review their pitches then select the one that works best for you. 

 

What’s next?

Once you’ve written the perfect brief, find out how to choose the right creative.

Need more help? Why not check out these example briefs:

Illustration

Logo

Animation

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Vicky
After studying English Literature at university, Vicky decided she didn’t want to be either a teacher or whoever it is that writes those interminable mash-up novels about Jane Austen and pirates, so sensibly moved into graphic design. She worked freelance for some time on various projects before starting at Twine and giving the site its unique, colourful look. Despite having studied in Manchester and spent some years in Cheshire, she’s originally from Cumbria and stubbornly refuses to pick up a Mancunian accent. A keen hiker, Vicky also shows her geographic preferences by preferring the Cumbrian landscape to anything more local.

Comments

Vicky

Vicky

After studying English Literature at university, Vicky decided she didn’t want to be either a teacher or whoever it is that writes those interminable mash-up novels about Jane Austen and pirates, so sensibly moved into graphic design.

She worked freelance for some time on various projects before starting at Twine and giving the site its unique, colourful look.

Despite having studied in Manchester and spent some years in Cheshire, she’s originally from Cumbria and stubbornly refuses to pick up a Mancunian accent. A keen hiker, Vicky also shows her geographic preferences by preferring the Cumbrian landscape to anything more local.

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